Tips

Chimney Safety

Chimney Safety

January 2020
The next two months of the year are the worst for chimney fires, especially if the temperature rises for a few days and then cools back down. Naturally, wood stoves get operated at a lower temperature when it warms up, causing creosote build-up in your chimney. When it cools off again, the stove gets cranked up, bringing the creosote up to ignition temperature (approx. 165°) and starting a chimney fire.

Tips for safe burning in the winter

Tips for safe burning in the winter

November 2019
As the temperatures drop and the need for heat increases, we would like to remind you of the importance of practicing safe burning with wood, coal, pellet or gas burning appliances. The following safety tips are a few that we deem important. Remember, you are building a fire in your home, and no matter what unit you have, if it is not installed and used according to its user guide it is not guaranteed to be safe.

Why Burning the Right Wood is Important

Why Burning the Right Wood is Important

With today’s high-efficiency wood stoves, fireplaces, inserts, and furnaces, it is more important than ever to make sure you are burning the right wood. The type of wood you burn not only affects the efficiency, but also the safety of your wood burner.

Spring Stove, Fireplace, and Chimney Maintenance

Spring Stove, Fireplace, and Chimney Maintenance

It’s best to clean out your unit and vent soon after the heating season. Ashes and Creosote can become corrosive if they gain condensation, which is likely if it sits in the unit or vent all summer. The following steps should taken after every heating season is over.

How will the EPA’s 2020 NSPS Regulations affect you?

How will the EPA’s 2020 NSPS Regulations affect you?

Phase 1 of the NSPS went into effect in March of 2015 and outlawed any woodstoves that produced more than 4.5 grams of emissions per hour. Most manufacturers in the industry were able to meet this standard by having their stoves retested and relabeled. Phase 2, howev- er, reduces it down to 2.5 grams of emissions per hour and is not as easy to meet. A lot of stove companies are adding a catalyst to their fireboxes which helps eliminate emissions, but makes the stove less user-friendly, and higher maintenance. Other stoves simply got discontin- ued because of the costs of redesigning and retesting their firebox.